Talesha Quinn from Parkes helps to commentate the 2019 Women's State of Origin

COMMENTATOR: Parkes product Talesha Quinn was lucky enough to still be involved in this year's Women's State of Origin despite missing NSW selection. Photo: NRL.com

COMMENTATOR: Parkes product Talesha Quinn was lucky enough to still be involved in this year's Women's State of Origin despite missing NSW selection. Photo: NRL.com

The last 12 months hasn't quite panned out the way Talesha Quinn would have liked, with the second-rower from Parkes missing selection to play in this year's Women's Rugby League State of Origin.

But the now 30-year-old said she was lucky enough to still be asked to be involved in the game in another way.

After a World Cup victory in 2017, a NSW State of Origin inaugural win in 2018, followed by signing with the St George Illawarra Dragons later that year - Quinn has battled a number of injuries ever since.

She's had two knee surgeries since July 2018 and has recently torn ligaments in her ankle, landing her in a moon boot.

She's only been able to play four full games of league this year, which Quinn said has been tough.

"I'm getting through it, trying to stay positive," she said.

Quinn swapped her footy boots for a microphone and a seat in the commentary box on June 21, as she watched her Blues team mates run away with a 14-4 victory over Queensland.

"I injured my ankle at the nationals championships where the NSW Origin squad was picked, which affected my chances of being able to play my best football," Quinn said.

"I was pretty shattered...but I got a call from Fox Studios asking me to be involved by commentating, which scared the hell out of me but was great to still be thought of and to be involved somewhat."

Quinn said it's always hard sitting on the sideline at any time, watching your mates play the sport you love, but especially so in a moon boot.

"I was sitting in the booth with my moon boot and last year's jersey on, so I would feel like I was still out there part of it," she said.

"It was super stressful but I had complete faith in the team that was selected and they certainly delivered.

"It was definitely a different perspective sitting, watching and actually seeing the whole field and positional plays.

"When you are on the field you don't see anything else apart from what your job is on the field. You see how much passion both teams have for their states, which is what makes Origin an Origin."

Quinn's not 100 per cent sure if commentating is a road she'd consider going down in the future, since she was very close to knocking back her first appearance, but she hasn't entirely ruled it out.

"I wouldn't call myself an amazing commentator," she laughed.

"But these opportunities don't come around very often and who knows what doors will open from here in regards to more jobs. I'd love to continue to learn and become better."

For now, Quinn has a transfer into the air force from the Australian Army to change-up her career.

She's hoping to move to Newcastle, with plans to play there.

"But this year I want to be back playing good footy for the Mounties leading into finals," she said.

"I'm still fighting for an NRL contract for the end of the year and if that all falls through, the Australian Defence Force is heading over on a Pacific tour to Fiji, Tonga and Samoa in October, so I will be pushing for that."