Cattle numbers rise, lamb numbers fall

MARKETS: Lamb numbers were reduced at this at this week's sale but the store lambs that were on offer attracted strong competition. Photo: File
MARKETS: Lamb numbers were reduced at this at this week's sale but the store lambs that were on offer attracted strong competition. Photo: File

Forbes market reports from Meat and Livestock Australia's National Livestock Reporting Agency.

After no cattle sale last week due to the public holiday Monday, numbers jumped to 1,201 at Monday's cattle sale.

Quality was mixed with good numbers of well bred finished lines along with the secondary types.

The usual buyers were present and competing in a dearer market.

Yearling steers to processors lifted 10c to range in price from 540c to 580c/kg.

Those to feed were also 10c to 15c dearer to sell from 490c to 580c with lightweights to background and restockers reaching 738c/kg.

Yearling heifers to processors sold from 430c to 570c with prices varying with quality.

Those to feed received from 472c to 570c/kg.

Heavy steers and bullocks held steady to sell from 427c to 512c/kg.

Grown heifers reached 473c/kg.

Cows held steady with heavy 3 and 4 score selling from 392c to 422c and 2 scores averaging 386c/kg.

Numbers fell to 23,450 at Tuesday's lamb and sheep sale with lambs showing the decrease.

Lamb quality was also reduced from the previous sale with few well shaped and finished lambs on offer along with less weight yarded.

The usual buyers were present and competing in a cheaper market.

There was 8,750 new season lambs penned and prices slipped $9/head though less on the few better lambs.

Trade weights to 26kg sold from $200 to $248 with heavyweights from $235 to $275/head.

Carcase prices averaged from 902 to 959c/kg cwt.

Store lambs were the exception attracting strong competition with restockers paying from $182 to $217/head.

Old lambs were also cheaper falling $10 to $15/head.

Trade weights to 26kg sold from $191 to $246 and export lambs ranged in price from $250 to $304/head

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