WHAT'S ON

Parkes Motor Museum receives three brilliant new exhibits

The Parkes Motor Museum has been regarded as one of the best motor museums of its size since its relocation to the Henry Parkes Centre 11 years ago - but recent changes have made it even better!

It has now been fully air conditioned by Parkes Shire Council, which not only provides a comfortable environment for visitors all year round, but also helps keep the astounding range of exhibits in great condition.

The museum's display has also received a significant boost with the addition of some new exhibits:

1911 Swiss Martini Model GA

A 1911 Martini car.

A 1911 Martini car.

Martini cars were manufactured in Switzerland from 1897 to 1934 by Adolph von Martini, whose father Friedrich was the inventor of the action used in the Martini-Henry rifle.

This 1911 Martini GA is believed to be one of only five existing worldwide.

1916 Dodge Bros Touring

WHAT A BEAUTY: A Dodge Brothers touring car with 'cathedral windows' from 1914 is one of three new exhibits at the Parkes Motor Museum. Photo: SUPPLIED.

WHAT A BEAUTY: A Dodge Brothers touring car with 'cathedral windows' from 1914 is one of three new exhibits at the Parkes Motor Museum. Photo: SUPPLIED.

This is the same as the very first car built by the Dodge brothers in 1914.

This particular car was originally built in Detroit and brought out from America as deck cargo during the Great War, and sold by Dalgetys.

It was later converted into a utility (a common practice during petrol rationing, as commercial vehicles were entitled to more petrol coupons than passenger vehicles) and purchased as a wreck from Dungog and restored to its original condition.

The distinctive cathedral lights pattern windows were replicated by the owner, following the original measurements.

Harley Davidson motorcycle outfit

This particular exhibit is on loan from the NRMA.

The NRMA established its roadside assistance service in 1924 with two patrols dressed in khaki, with the motto 'Never Refuse Motorists' Assistance.'

Contrary to popular belief, the first patrols didn't fix broken-down cars; they instead supervised parked cars, taking them for short spins so their owners didn't get a parking fine.

Patrolmen later provided roadside assistance, first using motorcycle outfits such as the one on display.

Under present COVID-19 arrangements, the museum is open weekdays between 9.00am and 4.00pm.

Well worth a visit during these school holidays with restrictions lifting!

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