Health and Defence bringing COVID-19 vaccination clinic to Parkes shire

Australian Defence Force and Western NSW Local Health District's first walk-in vaccination clinic in Dubbo on the weekend. Photo Dubbo Daily Liberal.
Australian Defence Force and Western NSW Local Health District's first walk-in vaccination clinic in Dubbo on the weekend. Photo Dubbo Daily Liberal.

A COVID-19 vaccination clinic run in partnership with the Australian Defence Forces will be in Parkes from August 24 to 26, and in coming weeks visit Peak Hill, Eugowra and Trundle.

The clinic is offering AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccination, depending on each person's eligibility, to:

  • 12 years and over - for people who are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or have a significant underlying medical condition or disability.
  • 16 years and over - for the general population.

Second dose clinics will happen three weeks later. Pfizer will be available.

You must not attend the vaccination clinic if:

  • You are waiting on a COVID-19 test result.
  • You are a confirmed close contact of a confirmed positive COVID-19 case.
  • You are unwell. If you have any COVID symptoms, get tested and isolate until you receive a negative test result.
  • You have had any other vaccination (including flu) in the previous seven days.

Head to Northparkes Oval, Alexandra Street:

  • Tuesday 24th August, 10am - 4pm
  • Wednesday 25th August, 9am - 4pm
  • Thursday 26th August, 9am - 3pm

Come prepared with food and drink, as well as warm clothing given the weather forecast, as the queue may be long.

Venue and opening times to be confirmed but clinics in Parkes' immediate area include:

  • Peak Hill - 27 August
  • Trundle - 2 September
  • Eugowra - 2 September

Health District chief executive Scott McLachlan said the vaccination teams would be supported by healthcare workers, including Aboriginal health workers.

They'll return in three weeks to deliver the second dose.

"We've seen the Delta strain of Covid-19 attack our communities and while the current lockdown should help, getting vaccinated is clearly our best weapon.

"Covid-19 is incredibly easy to spread and can make even healthy people very sick. If we have too many people getting sick from Covid it's going to get in the way of our hospitals and health services taking care of everyone - whether they have Covid or need treatment for something else.

"The vaccine can help stop you getting Covid-19, and if you do get it, the vaccine will mean you're less likely to get really sick, or pass it onto someone else.

"This is an incredible opportunity for these communities," Mr McLachlan said.