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Parkes' Rebecca Miller completes Bathurst leg of 355-kilometre charity run

DEFIANT: Parkes woman Rebecca Miller completed a marathon's worth of running in Bathurst on Wednesday as part of a 355-kilometre trek to Sydney to fundraise for children with cancer and their families. Photo: SAM BOLT
DEFIANT: Parkes woman Rebecca Miller completed a marathon's worth of running in Bathurst on Wednesday as part of a 355-kilometre trek to Sydney to fundraise for children with cancer and their families. Photo: SAM BOLT

In an incredible showing of perseverance, Parkes woman Rebecca Miller completed a marathon's worth of running in Bathurst yesterday as part of a Herculean effort to raise funds for cancer research.

Ms Miller completed laps of the Bathurst Sportsground and Mount Panorama before finishing the remainder around Morse Park, incorporating a section of her 355-kilometre run [8.5 marathons] from Parkes to Westmead Children's Hospital.

The effort is part of a $100,000 fundraising goal for Ms Miller's fundraiser, The Ripple of Kindness Project, supporting The Leukaemia Foundation, Bandaged Bear, Carrie's Beanies for Brain Cancer and Can Assist.

"The fundraiser has been two years in the making, and it all started to honour Lilly Wyburn, a beautiful little girl who sadly lost her battle with leukaemia at the age of eight in 2017," Ms Miller said.

"Leukaemia and brain cancer are the two deadliest diseases among children, and I wanted to support foundations that support both ill children and their families, as they often need as much help as their child."

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Ms Miller has already raised around $35,000.

Now five days into her run, Ms Miller will pass through Lithgow, Katoomba and Penrith before finishing at Westmead on Sunday.

She said the experience so far has been both enlightening and strenuous.

"I completed the first two days in Parkes, 50 kilometres each day, and having my home community support me along the way certainly helped me through it," Ms Miller said.

"But day three [in Orange] was tough; my feet were hurting, every muscle of my body was aching; I had to fight every battle that day."

"However, the pain is nothing that can't be healed, and it's all about mentally pushing yourself through it and reminding yourself of why you're doing it."

Ms Miller said the pain is certainly worth the fight to support rural families, who are often at a disadvantage when it comes to getting specialist health care for their critically ill children.

"If this fundraiser can help alleviate the pain and stress for those families, its worth the pain of a daily marathon," she said.

To support the cause, visit The Ripple of Kindness Project Facebook page.

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