Looking at Landcare | The two topics that we are addressing are a nuisance across the state and particularly within our shires - Blue Heliotrope and Feral Pigs!

Feral impact: Not only eating, but over-grazing particular plant communities and trample native vegetation and contaminate water sources, swampy areas and creek banks, because we all know how much they love to wallow.

Feral impact: Not only eating, but over-grazing particular plant communities and trample native vegetation and contaminate water sources, swampy areas and creek banks, because we all know how much they love to wallow.

We are thrilled to be hosting two fabulous workshops in Parkes and Forbes with a Focus on Ferals.

The word Feral conjures up so many pictures.

To explain the concept when I was talking with a group of kids during the holidays, I asked if they had ever been told they were totally feral!

Usually it has a connotation of not being very nice and a nuisance.

That is where we are headed with these workshops.

The two topics that we are addressing are a nuisance across the state and particularly within our shires - Blue Heliotrope and Feral Pigs!

Blue heliotrope is well suited to drought conditions, spread across more than 110 000 hectares in NSW alone.

It is causes toxicity in stock, with varying impacts on different species ranging from death in pigs to severe liver and brain damage in horses, cattle and sheep.

With the ability to adapt to a wide range of habits, producing both from see and root fragments, it can spread aggressively with machinery, livestock and humans.

There are a range of control methods, which we are looking to hear about at our workshops.

A think most of us would have a fair understanding of how feral pigs came to be 'feral'.

Obviously, they were introduced as domestic livestock and have spread throughout New South Wales.

As well as impacting on the environment, they can cause considerable damage to crops and pasture.

These ferals impact on the natural environment by not only eating, but over-grazing particular plant communities and trample native vegetation and contaminate water sources, swampy areas and creek banks, because we all know how much they love to wallow.

They don't just stick with vegetarian options, with a liking for new-born lambs, frogs, reptiles, birds and small mammals.

We look forward to hearing from the people that are addressing these issues on the ground every day and have the experience to share with us about feasible management options.

Parkes workshops are being held between 9.30am and 3pm on Tuesday, May 21 at Kelly Reserve and Forbes workshops are being held on Wednesday, May 22 at the Northside Chapel.

These workshops are open to the general public, but an RSVP is required to cwllpo@hotmail.com, 0418 611 053 or via stickytickets.

For further information on this article or upcoming events, please go to www.centralwestlachlanlandcare.org, facebook, twitter or Instagram @cwllandcare.

Until next week, happy Landcaring!