AT THE END OF THE DAY | It's not unusual: Miles maintains Cup giants' winning formula

HERE COMES THE BOOM: Trundle is looming as the team to beat, again, in the Woodbridge Cup, making the Boomers one of the most consistent sides in Western over last five years. Inset, captain-coach Josh Miles.
HERE COMES THE BOOM: Trundle is looming as the team to beat, again, in the Woodbridge Cup, making the Boomers one of the most consistent sides in Western over last five years. Inset, captain-coach Josh Miles.

It's the club with one of the smallest player pools in Western Division, an outrageously wide main street and a Welsh coach that sometimes needs a translator.

But the message out of Trundle, week-after-week, needs no translating.

It's crystal clear: catch us if you can.

The Boomers are undefeated in 2019 and head into this weekend's Woodbridge Cup grand final rematch with Manildra seemingly on track to claim a third straight top grade premiership.

Remembering, this is a town of a touch over 600 people.

And every one of them, and then probably 1000 more, will be there at Berryman Oval on Saturday when the Boomers' undefeated 2019 record goes on the line against those mighty charging Rhinos from Manildra, a side also riding high on the back of five straight wins to start the year.

Following last year's thrilling 26-22 grand final at Manildra, this is the top-of-the-table blockbuster we've been waiting for.

"It's our charity day as well, and we had a big crowd last year ... everyone in town goes," Boomers coach Josh Miles said in a thick Welsh accent.

"I missed out on the grand final (last year) but, from what I watched that day, they're a strong team and new additions they have only make them stronger.

A few people had written us off at the start of the season ... but we're looking better each week.

Trundle skipper Josh Miles on his side's undefeated start to its premiership defence.

"But it's been a great start to the season for us. A few people had written us off at the start of the season, we had lost a few players but we're looking better each week."

The fact Miles says his side is getting better and better should serve as a pretty decent warning shot to the Rhinos, considering how good Trundle has been for a number of years.

The Boomers are the two-time defending premiers after title wins in 2018 and 2017, and made the 2016 and 2015 grand finals as well.

In the 73 regular season games Trundle has played since the start of the 2015 season, the Boomers have won 60.

ON THE WAY: Miles (kneeling, front) and his Boomers teammates after a win at Trundle.

ON THE WAY: Miles (kneeling, front) and his Boomers teammates after a win at Trundle.

That's a winning percentage near 83 per cent.

Aside from Dubbo CYMS and Orange CYMS in Groups 11 and 10 respectively, you won't find a more consistent outfit in the region.

Throw in the fact the Boomers also field a ladies league tag side and a youth league team and it's hard to fathom how a town, population 666, fields three grades let alone comes up trumps so often, too.

You ask Miles, though, and the reason is pretty simple.

I tell you, my Aussie twang comes in and out and then the Welsh takes over and I'm sure it's hard to understand.

Boomers' Welsh coach Josh Miles.

"Since I've been involved I think the reason we have such a strong squad is because everyone buys in and is on the same page. We're all proud of the badge," Miles reveals.

Which is something he's ensuring he continues to instill at the club, in his first year as coach with a markedly younger squad.

"Everywhere I coach I try and set small, realistic goals week-by-week and it seems to be slowly improving us as a group," he said.

Wins over Canowindra, Grenfell, Condobolin, Eugowra (via forfeit), Molong and then a 62-6 thumping of Peak Hill are testament to that gradual progression.

Connor Farrar, too, Miles says, is just one of a handful of Boomers boys shining in 2019 while young Karl Turner and Brad Watt, the latter transitioning from the halves to fullback this season, have been immense.

"I thought even with a bit of a younger side that we'd be up there (in the top three). I guess it depends on the strength of the competition," Miles added, his combination with last year's premiership-winning coach Adam Hall also beginning to flourish.

And the sprays? The ones in Welsh?

"I have a translator at training," Miles laughed. "I tell you, my Aussie twang comes in and out and then the Welsh takes over and I'm sure it's hard to understand."

Jack's jumping the Blues queue

State of Origin teams get named in a couple of weeks and the raft of injuries to hit the NSW outside backs opens the door for Jack Wighton to make his Blues debut on June 5.

TRY TIME: Jack Wighton is mobbed after scoring a try during the NRL Magic Round at Suncorp Stadium. Photo: AAP

TRY TIME: Jack Wighton is mobbed after scoring a try during the NRL Magic Round at Suncorp Stadium. Photo: AAP

Wighton played his junior footy with the Bloomfield Tigers and later with Orange CYMS and as a tough defender and a big body he'll handle the step up if called upon by NSW coach Brad Fittler for game one at Brisbane.

The fact his form at five-eighth has been tremendous and Canberra is in the NRL top four will also help his cause, should selectors take a shot and throw the 26-year-old a debut in the centres, with the likes of Jarck Bird, Latrell Mitchell, Tom Trbojevic, Curtis Scott and Joey Leilua battling injury while incumbent James Roberts has been dumped to reserve grade by Broncos coach Anthony Seibold.

Wellington ace Kotoni Staggs has replaced Roberts in the Brisbane backline and has been floated as an outside chance of an origin call-up, as has Coonamble junior Jesse Ramien who is now playing with the Knights.

But you'd have to think given the injuries the Blues are suffering, Wighton will be in the mix somewhere, be it in the starting side or perhaps in the 14 jumper on the bench.