Construction of new Recycled Water Rising Main under way in Parkes

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: The new Recycled Water Rising Main is slowly forming as contractors make their way around town laying new pipes. This is a recent scene at Harrison Park in Nash Street.
UNDER CONSTRUCTION: The new Recycled Water Rising Main is slowly forming as contractors make their way around town laying new pipes. This is a recent scene at Harrison Park in Nash Street.

Many Parkes residents would have noticed a lot of activity with workers laying pipes around town of late.

Well the much-anticipated Recycled Water Rising Main construction is most certainly under way.

Parkes Shire Council's Director of Infrastructure Andrew Francis says the work may bring minor traffic disruptions while the new pipes are being laid, but “it will ultimately increase the security of the town's water supply”.

The new purple pipe network is the second phase in the Parkes Recycled Water Scheme, and Mr Francis said it will deliver recycled water to the town's sporting fields and open spaces, including the Parkes Golf Course and the Parkes Jockey Club.

“The current drought really emphasises why water conservation is vital,” Mr Francis said.

“Council recently had to declare Level 2 water restrictions after the water level at Lake Endeavour fell to 33 percent, so the Recycled Water Scheme will be a welcome addition to our urban water network.”

The drought emphasises why water conservation is vital.

Parkes Shire Council's Director of Infrastructure Andrew Francis

The recycled water will not be available to domestic customers, but Mr Francis said it will still provide flow-on benefits for residents.

“Council has to maintain our sporting fields and public parks, and ordinarily this water comes from our potable (drinking) supply,” he said.

“Using recycled water for municipal irrigation has a triple benefit. Firstly, it reduces the demand on our town water supply; secondly, it creates a second use for water that would otherwise be wasted; and it is more cost-effective than using potable water for irrigation.

Council is building an entirely new waterpipe network and its expected the construction will be low-impact.

“The contractors will make every effort to minimise disruption, including using non-potable water for dust suppression,” Mr Francis said.

“We really appreciate the public's understanding with any inconveniences over the coming months.”

Pipeline route and construction updates are published on Parkes Shire Council’s website under Public Notices.

Mr Francis said directly impacted residents will also be contacted prior to construction moving into their area.

“We also urge residents to observe the new Level 2 water restrictions, and make small adjustments to their routine to reduce water consumption,” he added.