Parkes Elvis Festival, 2019: Elvis, the real one, is in the building | Video, photos, pictures

SURVIVOR: Elvis Singer says growing up with such a famous name wasn't easy. He was among the first-time visitors to this year's festival. Photo: NADINE MORTON

SURVIVOR: Elvis Singer says growing up with such a famous name wasn't easy. He was among the first-time visitors to this year's festival. Photo: NADINE MORTON

THINK growing up with the name of a legendary singer would be easy? Think again.

Elvis Singer, yes this is his real name on his driver’s licence, comes from Adelaide and this is the first time he has attended the Parkes Elvis Festival.

Mr Singer said growing up being named after such a famous singer was extraordinarily difficult.

“It was pretty rough, I had a lot of problems and people picked on me and started fights with me,” he said.

“I’ve been ridiculed and laughed at for years.”

Mr Singer said people often thought that Elvis was a name he had chosen for himself, rather than it being the one he was given when he was born.

It was pretty rough, I had a lot of problems and people picked on me and started fights with me.

Elvis Singer

“Quite often when I was growing up I wouldn’t use my name,” he said. “But, now it’s working for me.”

It could have been something to do with his birth name, but Mr Singer has also long had a love for Elvis Presley’s music.

“I've always wanted to be a tribute artist,” he said.

These days he travels the country performing not only as Elvis, but also Tom Jones, Johhny O’Keefe and Cliff Richard.

“I do the ’68 Comeback Elvis and the early Elvis with the gold jacket,” he said.

“The last three years I’ve really given it my all.”

Mr Singer said he was really hoping to come to last year’s Parkes Elvis Festival as the theme was the ’68 Comeback, however, financially he just could not get here.

“This year I made it happen,” he said.

Not only is Mr Singer busking at this year’s Parkes Elvis Festival, but he also got a spot on a live broadcast by the Sunrise television show in Cooke Park on Thursday.

It was there that he also met the festival’s headline act, American born Elvis tribute artist Ted Torres Martin.

And, having already made a few connections, Mr Singer has been invited back by festival organisers.

“I’ve been given a spot for next year,” he said.

“I’ve always wanted to come, but never thought I’d get the opportunity that I’m getting at the moment. It’s turning into a real dream.”

Mr Singer will be busking outside Dad and Dave’s Antique Shop on Clarinda Street daily.